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This recipe is adapted from King Arthur Flour‘s Easy Amaranth Pancake recipe. Spelt is a high-protein, low-glycemic index primitive grain. Amaranth is a perennial grain high in protein and iron; it’s also a low-glycemic food. I was trying for something close to the Wild Roots Ancient Grain Pancake & Waffle Mix that I haven’t been able to find anymore after getting hooked on it and finishing off the massive bag I bought at Costco. Mine isn’t better; it’s just different. I will say, however, that this recipe is lighter than the Wild Roots version. The picture has pancakes with blueberries stirred into the batter, but blueberries or sliced bananas would be pretty great, too.

  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 1/4 cups milk (or non-dairy milk)*
    • Add more milk for thinner pancakes, less for thicker cakes
  • 3 tablespoons melted butter or vegetable oil
  • 1 cup amaranth flour
  • 1/2 cup spelt flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon Stevia in the Raw
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Beat the eggs and milk until light and foamy. Stir in the butter or vegetable oil.
  2. Whisk the dry ingredients together to evenly distribute the salt, baking powder, and sugar.
  3. Gently and quickly mix into the egg and milk mixture. Let the batter rest for at least 15 minutes, while the griddle is heating; it’ll thicken slightly.
  4. Heat a heavy frying pan over medium heat, or set an electric griddle to 375°F. Lightly grease frying pan or griddle. The pan or griddle is ready if a drop of water will skitter across the surface, evaporating immediately.
  5. Drop 1/4 cupfuls of batter onto the lightly greased griddle. Bake on one side until bubbles begin to form and break, about 2 minutes; then turn the pancakes and cook the other side until brown, about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. Turn over only once.
  6. Serve immediately. Note: These pancakes keep well in the fridge for a few days.

To my #COM3100 and #com3210news students and all my grad student friends, you need to nourish your body for your mind to work during finals. This recipe, improvised during tonight’s snowstorm, will fortify you for all those tests and final papers you’re wrapping up. The result is a tummy-warming soup that’s mild, nourishing, and filling. It’s easily customizable to vegan by substituting vegetable stock for chicken stock. It’s my gift to you as a former food page editor. Oh, and I want to give a shout out to The Desert Sun in Palm Springs and Holly Ocasio Rizzo for giving me the chance to learn all about food and cooking and actually be paid to do it.

It’s not that hard, and it’s entirely improvised. You can make up your own recipes, too, if you try.

Ingredients
Butter, whatever seems right to sautee chopped veggies
1 Vidalia onion, chopped into chunks
1 red pepper, chopped into chunks
4-5 celery stalks, sliced
1 cup water
1 can (14 oz.) red kidney beans, drained
1 can (14 oz.) black beans, drained
1 can (14 oz.) pinto beans, drained
1 carton chicken stock (I like the Costco stuff, whatever size that may be)
Parsley flakes, whatever seems right
Adobo w/cumin seasoning, a couple of generous shakes
Cracked black pepper, whatevs (yeah, I know “whatevs” is not AP style; I’m indy, so I get to make up my own style)
Sea salt, whatevs
1 package lemon-flavored Papardelle noodles (I got mine at Trader Joe’s)

Sautee chopped veggies in butter over low-medium heat until just south of firm.
Dump in water. Crank heat to high. Allow to simmer down, about 5 minutes.
Dump in drained beans.
Dump in chicken stock.
Dump in parsley flakes.
Dump in Adobo con cumin.
Crack that pepper and shake that salt into the pot.
Turn heat down to low. Simmer for 1 hour and 5 minutes.
Dump in Papardelle noodles. Simmer for 10 minutes.

Serve. Eat. Feel warmed and loved. Then go nail those final exams and projects. I believe in you. Go do it!

Story pitch forms are a useful tool for reporters who are developing a story. Use this form to guide your thinking about what your article will be about and whom you will contact to interview for your story. Remember the requirements of our stories:

— Each story will be 500-750 words in length.
— Each story will have no fewer than THREE SEPARATE HUMAN SOURCES whom you have interviewed.
— If you’re covering a speech story, you must include lots of quotes from the speech or lecture; comment about the speech from a member of the audience; and comment from one other type of source, which might be another audience member, an event organizer, a protester, or someone else who provides an opposing viewpoint about the ideas presented by the person who gave the lecture or speech. 

Topic Beat Story Pitch Form

  1. The topic, issue, or public event I plan to write is about:

 

  1. This story is appropriate to my beat because:

 

  1. This story is timely because:

 

  1. These are among the people in the community (aka stakeholders) who are affected by this topic or issue:

 

  1. My leader source will be:

          This source can answer the following questions I have about this story:

 

  1. My expert source will be:

            This source can answer the following questions I have about this story:

 

  1. My functionary source will be:

            This source can answer the following questions I have about this story:

 

  1. My real people source or sources will be:

            This source can answer the following questions I have about this story:

 

  1. These are the names of the three people with whom I am setting up interviews for this story:

 

Source 1:

Person’s name:

Email:

Phone number:

Source 2:

Person’s name:

Email:

Phone number:

Source 3:

Person’s name:

Email:

Phone number:

Presenting research in progress and sharing ideas on panels at the AJHA convention are great ways to sharpen your focus, expand your thinking, and cultivate connections with other scholars. But how do you write a successful panel or RIP proposal?

Advice about that is typically passed down informally from adviser to grad student or from senior scholar to junior scholar. Like so many aspects of academic culture, it tends to be shared orally. And those who lack such coaching may not even consider submitting a proposal for panels or research in progress because they don’t know where to start.

In the interest of encouraging those unfamiliar with the process, we considered the following question: “What does someone preparing a panel proposal for the first time need to do to compete with established scholars?” What follows is a starting point to answer that question. We welcome any pointers more established AJHA members would like to share. Look here for the AJHA Call for Papers, Panels, and Research in Progress for the 2017 annual convention in Little Rock, Arkansas.

How do I write a successful panel proposal?

  • Familiarize yourself with the AJHA panel sessions held in recent years, which can be found in programs from those conferences. This will help you avoid repetition and give you a sense of the type of panels that get accepted to the conference.
  • Make your proposal appealing to media historians working outside your particular field of research. Rather than focus on a narrow slice of media history, think about ways to broaden the scope. This might mean addressing some aspect of theory, method, teaching, or publication that applies to historians working in all areas.
  • Aim for diversity among your panelists, and get a commitment from them before you submit the proposal. The most persuasive proposals include panelists from diverse perspectives, backgrounds, and institutions who are well trained in the subject and open to discussion.
  • About commitments from panelists: Sometimes panel lineups shift after acceptance. That’s understandable if a medical or family emergency comes up just before the convention. However, the Research Committee expects all panel organizers to obtain firm commitments from members before they submit the proposal.
  • Panels that put participants and the audience in conversation with each other are among the most successful ones at the convention.
  • Most important, demonstrate your knowledge by briefly summarizing previous writing or commentary on the topic before suggesting a new avenue for discussion. A panel proposal should be written like a research proposal, with the same attention given to clarity, thoroughness, proper writing, and citations. Rather than propose questions to be answered through primary research, a panel puts forth ideas to be explored through compelling discussion. As with any proposal, your goal is to demonstrate two things: 1) that your idea is worth executing, and 2) that you are capable of executing it.

How do I write a successful research in progress proposal?

  • The research-in-progress submission should represent more than an idea, but far less than an almost completed paper. The proposal should include initial research questions, primary sources, and a justification for why your project is significant. Ideas for relevant theory and methods should be included, if known. In sum, the proposal should include a well-defined topic and demonstrate that the researcher has a compelling, significant, and executable research project.
  • That said, the research should be at a stage where suggestions for additional research questions, theory, sources (primary and secondary) and research methods would be useful and meaningful.
  • Explain what kind of primary sources you are looking for in the archives. Show that the proposal has gone beyond the initial phase by listing the primary sources you’re using or plan to use and how they are significant to the project.
  • Clearly state the purpose of your project. Though you don’t have to hit people over the head with it, there is no clearer way to begin your statement of purpose than to write, “The purpose of this project is to …”
  • Make a clear and compelling argument supporting the significance of your project. What have previous scholars done? How will your project advance the field?
  • Remember that Research in Progress is for scholars who have not completed a project and who are looking for feedback on how to take their projects to the next level.

MICHAEL FUHLHAGE, Wayne State University, is AJHA Research Chair, Coordinator of the Research Papers Competition and Administrator of the Joseph McKerns Research Grant.

MELITA GARZA, Texas Christian University, is AJHA Research in Progress Competition Coordinator.

TRACY LUCHT, Iowa State University, is AJHA Panels Competition Coordinator.

 

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